November 25, 2021

Resource: Guiding Improvement – A Decision Tree

Harry Fletcher-Wood summarises and conveys some key findings from the evidence around feedback and guiding improvement in this decision tree.

The evidence on feedback: a decision tree

Feedback can improve students’ learning and performance “if delivered correctly”, but the large body of research suffers from “many conflicting findings and no consistent pattern of results.” For example, should we give immediate or delayed feedback? Studies point in apparently contradictory directions.

Could a decision tree help?

Harry Fletcher-Wood summarises and conveys some key findings from the evidence around feedback and guiding improvement in this decision tree:

Image of the feedback decision tree by Harry Fletcher-Wood – VNET Education CIC

This post has been adapted from the blog The evidence on feedback: a decision tree with the permission of Harry Fletcher-Wood. If you would like to read the complete blog, please click here.

Do you want to find out more about responsive teaching? 

Join us on January 12th for a webinar led by Harry Fletcher Wood, where he will help teachers to identify who has understood what in the classroom, and how we can help pupils to improve.

image of kids raising their hands at school - vnet education cic

Share this post

Similar Posts

The Principles of Effective Practice in Teaching Reading: Reading Aloud and its Role in Supporting Comprehension – Part 6

Through reading aloud, we remove the need for children to engage in word reading and this frees them up to concentrate on language comprehension alone.

Read More →

An Ethic of Excellence

How do you embed excellence into schools’ everyday practices, not as an incidental or an accident, but as an actual ethic?

Whilst most educators are familiar with Austin’s Butterfly and the principles of improvement through critique towards excellence, fewer are aware of the foundations of that approach are Ron Berger’s Ethic of Excellence.

Read More →

Best Bets for Improving Writing Stamina

Evidence from the EEF (May 2022) shows that Covid-related disruption has caused learning loss in children. There is some evidence that the writing outcomes for primary-aged and Year 7 children were lower than expected compared to previous year groups (Christodoulou, 2021, 2022). One of the common issues is that writing stamina has been heavily impacted.

Read More →

The Principles of Effective Practice in Teaching Reading: Questioning the Author – Part 5

The point of Questioning the Author is to get children to grapple with an author’s ideas and, if necessary, to challenge an author’s intended meaning in an effort to build understanding.

Read More →

The Principles of Effective Practice in Teaching Reading: Addressing barriers in Early Reading – Part 4

Take a moment to think about the children in your class or school. Which children still do not have good word recognition? Which of the barriers that I have outlined so far do you think might be holding them back?

Read More →

The Principles of Effective Practice in Teaching Reading: Group Guided Reading in KS1 – Part 3

Whilst for some children, working with a teacher 1:1 might improve reading accuracy and fluency, this isn’t always possible; therefore, often we arrange children into groups for reading practice.

Read More →

Sign up for our newsletter

and keep up-to-date with all news from VNET CIC. You can unsubscribe at any time.